August 29, 2016 Last Updated 8:29 am

Survey from online fashion site finds blogs more influential than fashion magazines

Morning Brief: Of course, there is no reason why a magazine can’t also be a blog, assuming its editor creates a robust line-up of bloggers

The last week of August here in the Midwest really does mean summer is nearly an end. In Los Angeles, where I started my career at Hearst, the end of August meant you were still in the middle of summer, with the season not really ending until the fire season of October and those Santa Ana winds.

Unfortunately, Labor Day won’t mean the start of football season this year so much as the true beginning of the stretch run of the presidential campaign. Look for things to get even more ugly between now and election day. But at least the finish line will be coming in view.

Your Monday morning round-up:


vogue-cover-300-8-16Psyche (UK): Survey finds fashion blogs more influential than fashion magazines

Of those surveyed, a huge 82% stated that fashion blogs would become more influential than fashion magazines in the future, stating that the appeal of a constant stream of fresh, free content would push blogs ahead. In contrast, just 18% of respondents thought that magazines would remain dominant, primarily due to the fact that magazines have been around for longer – the idea being that magazines are so well established they will retain their legacy within the fashion world.

Mumbrella (Australia): Homes magazines can survive in print while having online presence

The publisher of Bauer Media’s homes titles has emphasised the importance of the printed magazine within the category, rejecting the idea that its homes online hub, Homes to Love, has diluted the printed magazine’s value.

Cornelia Schulze, Bauer Media’s specialist division publisher, told Mumbrella: “The print product is absolutely important but it is part of a broader brand offering. The market is tough but we’ve got an offering across the four brands that covers the whole journey in the homes market.

Publisher’s Weekly: Why A West Coast Software Company is Getting into Book Publishing

NationBuilder, Coleman explained, sells software that helps organizations more efficiently communicate with people in their network. Particularly popular among political organizations and nonprofits, the company’s clients include schools such as Columbia University and various political candidates in the U.S. and much of Europe. (Both sides of the Brexit campaign, for example, used NationBuilder.)

That a software company would be interested in a book division seems, as Coleman acknowledged, a bit odd. But the idea for the book unit was something that began brewing when Coleman was hired as a freelance editor to work on a book that Jim Gilliam, NationBuilder’s cofounder and CEO, had written.


The Guardian: Ian Traynor, Europe editor of the Guardian

Ian witnessed, reported and interpreted the critical turning points in post-cold war European history including the fall of the Berlin Wall and Germany’s reunification, the rise of Solidarity in Poland, the bloody breakup of Yugoslavia, as well as the European Union’s expansion and subsequent crises.

“Ian was one of the finest reporters of his generation, who brought a rare level of knowledge and expertise to his work,” said Katharine Viner, the Guardian’s editor-in-chief. “He covered many epoch-defining events for the Guardian, from the breakup of the Soviet Union to the Greek financial crisis, and he will be hugely missed by colleagues and readers alike.”

Chicago Tribune: John Carroll, former publisher of Chicago magazine, dies

John Carroll was publisher of Chicago magazine for 12 years before taking the same role at CS, the Chicago-area magazine of Modern Luxury, where he continued to build on his appreciation of the finest Chicago has to offer and the people who do the offering.

“If you’re the publisher of a city magazine, you’re kind of like ‘prince of the city,’ ” said Stephen Kong, who founded Modern Luxury with his brother Michael and recruited Carroll. “It’s really a local business job and you’re selling local businesses and it’s all about the relationships.”

…Carroll, 59, took his own life Wednesday at his summer home in Michiana Shores, Ind., according to his brother Tim. The longtime Chicago resident had been diagnosed late last year with frontotemporal lobe dementia, a terminal disease, his brother said.

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