June 6, 2016 Last Updated 3:40 pm

Two NPR journalists killed in Afghanistan; ABC India to begin auditing digital circulation in Q3

Morning Brief: Photojournalist David Gilkey and Afghan interpreter Zabihullah Tamanna were killed when their convoy was attacked on Sunday, two other NPR journalists in another vehicle were not injured

There remains a war in Afghanistan, though rarely is it mentioned in the media, or discussed on the campaign trail. Fifteen years and accounting, and yesterday NPR lost two journalists assigned to cover the conflict.

NPR photojournalist David Gilkey, Afghan interpreter Zabihullah Tamanna, were killed when their convoy was attacked. They are the first journalists killed since James P. Hunter, an army staff sergeant and journalist, was killed in 2010. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman and producer Monika Evstatieva were also in the convoy, but escape without injury. The team were embedded with Afghan Special Forces in Helmand Province when the attack occurred.

Here is NPR’s own report:

“David has been covering war and conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11. He was devoted to helping the public see these wars and the people caught up in them. He died pursuing that commitment,” said Michael Oreskes, NPR’s Senior Vice President of News and Editorial Director in an email to staff. “As a man and as a photojournalist, David brought out the humanity of all those around him. He let us see the world and each other through his eyes.”

“NPR reporters go to the ends of the world to get the story, frequently putting themselves in danger. Horrific incidents like this remind us of the important role journalists play in America’s civic life. They help us understand beyond the headlines and see the humanity in others,” said Jarl Mohn, President and CEO of NPR. “We are devastated by the death of David and Zabihullah. Our hearts go out to their families, friends and colleagues out in the field.”

Gilkey was a former Detroit Free Press photographer and video editor. In 2007 he helped the paper win an Emmy for “Michigan Marines: Band of Brothers,” a report on a 900-member Marine Reserve Unit from Michigan which covered their deployment in Fallujah, Iraq.

Here was a report Gilkey made from Gaza that NPR posted to Vimeo:


The Audit Bureau of Circulations in India announced late last week that the organization will begin auditing the digital circulations of Indian member publications, working with Nielsen to do so.

Beginning in the third quarter of this year, the ABC will report on digital readership levels on PC and mobile devices.

“The rate at which spends are shifting to digital, it has now become imperative to have a transparent system for understanding digital audiences, whether they are accessing information on websites or apps, from their PCs, tablets or mobile phones. This digital measurement service will add to ABC’s existing circulation audit service for publications. We are not restricting ourselves to the print publisher fraternity, but will extend the service to include digital property owners across sectors,” said Shashidhar Sinha, Chairman, Audit Bureau of Circulations.

“This is a historic moment, as for the first time in India, an industry body has started a service of this kind” “The rate at which spends are shifting to digital, it has now become imperative to have a transparent system for understanding digital audiences, whether they are accessing information on websites or apps, from their PCs, tablets or mobile phones. This digital measurement service will add to ABC’s existing circulation audit service for publications. We are not restricting ourselves to the print publisher fraternity, but will extend the service to include digital property owners across sectors. This is a historic moment, as for the first time in India, an industry body has started a service of this kind.”

Comments are closed.